Compare and contrast natural law theory and utilitarianism

From my experience and reading completely conflicting sources while having no formal education in the matter there seems to be two schools of thought on the matter One way of looking at it is this way: Here God's laws are on top and man's are on the bottom it's ordered by jurisdiction. Next is the Divine Law, which is what he tells us about Himself.

Compare and contrast natural law theory and utilitarianism

Print PDF hen examining various normative theories, a distinction is often made between deontological and teleological perspectives. Deontology from the Greek deon, meaning "duty" refers to an ethical theory or perspective based on duty or obligation.

A deontological, or duty-based, theory is one in which specific moral duties or obligations are seen as self-evident, having intrinsic value in and of themselves and needing no further justification.

Moral actions are evaluated on the basis of inherent rightness or wrongness rather than goodness or a primary consideration of consequences.

Holmes distinguishes between strong deontological theories, in which goodness is irrelevant to the rightness of an act, and weak deontological theories, in which goodness is relevant but not the primary determinant of moral rightness.

Kantianism, divine command theory and some rights-based theories are generally categorized as deontological theories. In contrast, teleology from the Greek telos, meaning goal or end describes an ethical perspective that contends the rightness or wrongness of actions is based solely on the goodness or badness of their consequences.

In a strict teleological interpretation, actions are morally neutral when considered apart from their consequences. Ethical egoism and utilitarianism are examples of teleological theories. While these descriptions appear to draw a clear distinction between theoretical perspectives, the two categories are not mutually exclusive.

Alternatively, the terms consequentialist and non-consequentialist are sometimes used.

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Some rights-based theories and theories of justice are consequentialist in their concern for outcomes while also claiming the inherent rightness of obligations related to human rights and justice. Page 1 of 2.Natural Law, Virtue and Situation Ethics ~ Review and Summary Objectives ~ (Over two lessons) To define the three terms and review their content.

To compare. Universalism and Utilitarianism: An Evaluation of Two Popular Moral Theories in Business Decision Making formulating our own law on basis of our understanding and the framework of our the reflective element in this theory, evoking a deep consideration for the well-being of all.

While natural law construed morality as a cluster of obligations as generated by the patterns of interdependence of human social life over the generations while utilitarianism redefines morality as a bundle of individual rights and democratically enacted laws that regulate social conduct within given jurisdiction.

Compare and contrast natural law theory and utilitarianism

Consequentialism. The results matter, not the actions themselves. Whatever has the best outcome is the best action. For example, under utilitarianism the goal is to take whatever action maximizes happiness, regardless of the motivations or nature of the action.

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Page 1 of 7 What is Social Contract Theory? The concept of social contract theory is that in the beginning man lived in the state of nature. It is in this way the natural law became a moral guide or directive to the sovereign for preservation of the natural rights of the subjects.

Individualism, materialism, utilitarianism and. While natural law construed morality as a cluster of obligations as generated by the patterns of interdependence of human social life over the generations while utilitarianism redefines morality as a bundle of individual rights and democratically enacted laws .

Main Issue Between Utilitarianism and Virtue Ethics - Oxford Scholarship