An analysis of aint no makin it an ethnographic study by jay macleod

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An analysis of aint no makin it an ethnographic study by jay macleod

This classic text addresses one of the most important issues in modern social theory and policy: how social inequality is reproduced from one generation to the next. With the original publication of Ain't No Makin' It, Jay MacLeod brought us to the Clarendon Heights housing project where we met the 'Brothers' and the 'Hallway Hangers'. Their story of poverty, race, and defeatism moved readers and . Jay MacLeod studied two groups of boys and young men who lived in a low-income neighborhood for his book, Ain't No Makin' It. The "Hallway Hangers," a group of mostly white boys, did not endorse meritocracy, the American achievement ideology. MacLeod begins the study by describing the youths: the first is a black minority group called The Brothers, and the second a group of white youths called the Hallway Hangers, so-called as they often 'hang out in the hallway'.

Their conditions are pretty similar. Each of their jobs and situations stems from their pasts, decisions, networking opportunities and mainly from where they began in high school in Clarendon Heights.

They all seem accepting if not satisfied of what they have become. Mokey Jay Macleod follows up with Mokey in Mokey ends up as a salaried night shift manager at a scanning machine company that produces and scans documents. He was able to manage to work his way up by paying close attention and doing well.

They liked him and therefore moved him up.

Reading Summary 11/7/13 "Ain't No Makin' It" by Jay Macleod Chapters 13 and 14 Ending | SOCY X

He moved from Clarendon Heights to Colorado. He ends up in a happy long term inter-racial relationship with his companion Karen. They live in a two bedroom apartment with their son Rayford. He is accepting and comfortable of what his life has become. Super Super is the only brother who continues to struggle financially due to his lack of steady employment.

His immediate past is full of drug dealing. His job at the moment is moving furniture at a moving company in which he earns eleven dollars an hour. He expresses that he feels that he can do better job wise.

His boss refuses to pay him more. He is divorced and has three children, one of which is not in his custody. Mike Macleod finds Mike in the industry of Real Estate after having been working for the postal service before.

Mike manipulated and networked his way into Real Estate Brokerage actually earning a decent substantial five digit income in the business. He is by far one of the most successful of all of the men- both Hallway Hangers and Brothers. He has been with his girlfriend for fourteen years.

An analysis of aint no makin it an ethnographic study by jay macleod

They decided not to get married. She has two daughters that Mike assists her with looking after and raising. They live in an old "Mill Town".

Jay MacLeod (Author of Ain't No Makin' It)

Together they live with four of his five children. He continues to work at "Jim's Tow". He drives trucks there on at eight to five schedule working forty hours a week. He continues to resent having to be "dirty" all the time due to the nature of the work.

An analysis of aint no makin it an ethnographic study by jay macleod

He admits to Macleod that he yearns for a cleaner job where he gets to look better and wear a suit. He says that people judge you buy the way you look.

He is happy that he has a house and a mortgage that he can afford and his children will benefit from but he does not have a car. He worked for several years working part time as a tape librarian at a bank for a temp agency. James mentions that he worked at Calvin Klein for several months but was laid off.

James discusses how dynamics in offices and in the work place are often complicated.

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They can be abundant, immoral and detrimental. He also discusses how race plays a factor. People judge him based on the fact that he is black. Nonetheless he's ended up as a Help Desk Administrator making about fifty two thousand a year with full benefits.

James married a pre-school teacher and they have two children. He tries to motivate his children to do well.Four years after the publication of Ain’t No Makin’ It and eight years after conducting his initial fieldwork—a period of time in which MacLeod studied in England and worked in rural Mississippi as a community organizer—MacLeod returned to Clarendon Heights to explore how the youths (then in their mid-twenties) had fared in their.

Ain't No Makin' It is an ethnography following the lives of two groups of boys growing up in Clarendon Heights, a public housing development in Massachusetts. Jay MacLeod considers the differing aspirations of the two groups of boys: one composed primarily of blacks and one composed primarily of /5(41).

A Rhodes scholar, Jay MacLeod holds degrees in social studies and theology. He and his wife, Sally Asher, spent four years in Mississippi, where their work with local teenagers led to the publication of Minds Stayed On Freedom: The Civil Rights Struggle In The Rural South, An Oral History.4/5(49).

An Analysis of Ain't No Makin' It, an Ethnographic Study by Jay MacLeod. 6, words. 16 pages. The Osage Nation Blood Quantum Proposal.

words. 3 pages. An Analysis of the More Than One Side of the Story and Theory of Creation. 1, words. 8 pages. A . In Ain't No Makin' It, Jay MacLeod studied two groups, the predominately white Hallway Hangers and the predominately black Brothers. Growing up in the same neighborhood under the same conditions, each group lives by a very different achievement ideology.

Jay MacLeod studied two groups of boys and young men who lived in a low-income neighborhood for his book, Ain't No Makin' It. The "Hallway Hangers," a group of mostly white boys, did not endorse meritocracy, the American achievement ideology.

Review of MacLeod, Jay: Ain't No Makin' It: Aspirations and Attainment in a Low-Income Neighborhood